Log-in
Search

Pitches per Inning

Posted on July 04, 2013 by Stephen Stemle | 0 comments

Pitches Per Inning

In baseball everything is recorded and statistics are of the upmost importance. But which numbers are the most important? In pitching, everyone seems to believe individual statistics like Earned Run Average (ERA), Strikeouts (K), and Walks+Hits/Inning Pitched (WHIP) are the best measurements of success on the mound. Although these statistics are very important and do determine who dominant pitchers are, we think Pitches Per Inning (P/IP) paints a bigger picture of which pitchers are most valuable to their team and should be used alongside the current mainstay pitching stats.  

Lets first take a look at the team benefits of a low Pitches Per Inning statistic.  Below we've listed team benefits that a low P/IP measures that other individual pitching statistics do not.   

  1. Measures average pitches it takes to get outs, the most important statistic for all pitchers.
  2. Defensive fielding percentage gets better with balls put in play early and often.
  3. It gives momentum to the pitcher's offense, gets them back in the dugout.
  4. It saves energy which generally improves pitch Lokation and velocity. 
  5. Keeps the bullpen fresh generally improving team winning percentage.
  6. Gives opposing pitcher less time to rest.
  7. Umpire generally opens strike zone when pitchers prove command.
  8. Improves durability and decreases injuries, making deeper pitching staffs.
  9. Hitters see less pitches which makes timing and pitch recognition more difficult.
  10. Hitters have less chance at seeing a mistake pitch.

The lower a pitcher's P/IP is, the better all around individual statistics they will have in addition to the team benefits mentioned above. The individual statistics we are referring to do not necessarily include strikeouts because K's generally increase P/IP.  There are so many people in and around the game that are fascinated with velocity and strikeouts that they loose track of the fact that a strikeout counts the same as a ground ball to the shortstop and velocity has no value in pitching statistics.     

As of May 21st, 2013 Pitches Per Inning is already displaying its importance in MLB. Of all qualifiers, the two pitchers with the highest P/IP are Vance Worley of the Minnesota Twins and Ryan Volgelsong of the San Francisco Giants, with P/IP at 18.4 and 18.1 respectively. These numbers directly effect their other numbers- both have ERA's above 6.2.

Jordan Zimmerman of the Washington Nationals has had an outstanding year thus far. He has gone 7-2 with an ERA of 1.62. Over his 66.2 innings pitched, which ranks 4th out of the qualifiers, he has struck out 45 batters. Although not a high strikeout percentage at 6 per 9 innings pitched, it directly correlates to his P/IP in which he ranks 1st in the league at an outstanding rate of 12.9, almost a full pitch better than his closest competitor Bronson Arroyo(13.6 P/IP). Zimmerman has thrived off of throwing strikes early in the count, and inducing early contact. This helps the team in numerous ways. The Nationals have won 78% of the time when Zimmerman pitches. 

Pitches per inning measures more than just individual statistics and looks beyond the "aw factor" of high velocity and strikeouts that everyone seems to be so fascinated with.  P/ IP measures pitches that get outs better than any other statistic. In the Lokator System pitches that get outs will always be the most important!

Continue reading →

Damage Control in Pitching and Golf

Posted on April 14, 2013 by Stephen Stemle | 0 comments

Today I'm watching the final round of the Masters, my favorite day to watch golf all year.  Augusta National is the most beautiful, yet unforgiving golf course on the planet.  When golfers miss their Lokations during this tournament they are penalized more than on any other.  By the same token, pitchers are hit around when they miss Lokations facing great hitters.  In this blog entry I want to discus how playing an unforgiving golf course and pitching to a great hitter are similar.  

In pitching the opponent is the hitter, while the opponent in golf is the course.  When you face tough hitters, just as when you play tough courses, Lokation becomes the most important aspect of success.  Good hitters will take advantage of Lokation mistakes and make you pay by driving the ball for extra base hits or taking a walk.  Difficult golf courses will make you pay with penalty strokes after missing Lokations in the water, woods, or the short side of the hole.

Damage control is a huge key to scoring well on a hard golf course or getting a good hitter out.  You have to miss in the correct Lokations to give yourself a chance at success.  For example, hitting an aproach shot into a green with water on the right is comparable to facing a right-handed pull hitter on the mound.  You obviously want to hit your Lokation first and foremost in either situation, but if you don't, you want to miss to the left of the green or away from the batter.

It is very important to be aware of the correct miss whenever you are weighing your options on the course or on the mound.  The good news is that pitchers should have an easier time than golfers when it comes to damage control because in pitching it is rarely a mistake to miss low, as in the 4 Zone or below.  For golfers, missing in the correct Lokation will be more difficult because their damage control miss could be different everytime.  

Whether you are a golfer, pitcher, or both, the next time you are on the mound or course, pay special attention to where your misses end up and the result that follows.  You'll find out that if you are concious of damage control and make adjustments accordingly, you will have a lower score in golf and give up less runs on the mound.     

 

Continue reading →

 
Scroll to top